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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
four time a year. his office was in new york and in new jersey. when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut, sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and we would discuss some of the things that had not been able, but a certain amount of stuff i cannot pursue. -- could not pursue. >> did you ever get any insight on how watergate happen? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably 1992 or thereabout, he told me and indicated that john mitchell have thought so too, that this book that was coming out, "silenced coup," they thought that was probably some of what happened the guy " said mitchell on the cover on one of his editions that they thought this was sort of our happened. so i got that sense from nixon. practical back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it > how did your research and where did you have to go? how long a process? you talk about going all over the east coast, on the back. correct the principal thing i did was i had been interested in the revolution since i was a kid. i think i was probably eight or n
years. that being said, i think he took cruises over to the mediterranean, over to the new york. when the seas were rough, churchill insisted on watching the storm, being held there by four or five -- he described them -- as brown, burly, greek sailors. when they took their meals during those storms come they would sit on the floor with bottles of champagne between their knees. this 88, 90-year-old man -- well, not 90, but in his late 80's. he lived a very rich life. and of course, the second premier ship in the early 1950's. i think lady soames is correct and she knows her father. the last years were a slow descent. diana, the daughter, died of an overdose of barbiturates. he did not quite get it. by 88, 89, the christmas of 1964 they brought in fresh oysters and champagne. his private secretary was there. his children. christmas dinner lasted well into the 26th, and i think it was january 29 winter chill refused his brandy and cigars after dinner for the first time ever. he went into a coma and his doctor -- both doctors said, it is a question now if it is going to be a day. and it
dribbled in. they were rust buckets and virtually obsolete. which roosevelt told t"new york times" and congress. he said we gave them junk and we get six or seven caribbean naval bases from the empire. at one point that summer i believe churchill wrote a letter and asked roosevelt to declare war. that is how desperate he was. and so after a few brandies in t the co vilville diaries churchi says they want to us bleed to death and pick up everything that is left for free. at one point they were thinking around the dipper table of having everyone in england melt their wedding rings because it might raise $8 million or $10 million of gold and use that to buy american goods because it was all cash and carry, to shame the americans. they didn't do that. host: how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? guest: one of the things, in doing this, i had to lock at what is he interested in? what is in his head. try to place churchill in his tim times. he was interested in norway, sumatra, not japan, not the pacific. his knowledge of the geography, the politics, the milita
office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut or sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and some of the things that had not been the school -- had not been discussedable before. >> did you ever get in setting to watergate and how that happened? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably in 1992 or thereabouts. he told me and he indicated that john mitchell thought so, too, that this book that was coming out, "silent coup" -- do you remember that one? that was probably some of what happened. he quoted mitchell on the cover. they thought that this was sort of how it happened. so i got that sense from him. >> going back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it to? how did your research it? how do have to go? -- how did you have to go? >> i have been interested in the revolution since there was a little kid. i was probably eight or nine when i would make a list of generals. i did nothing that was heading for anything very useful, but i always enjoyed that. th
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)